Gramercy Can Be Embracing In Its Cozy Village Charm

While you might not have a key to the members-only Gramercy Park, the rest of the neighborhood is a warm and inviting place to call home.

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WHAT TO EXPECT

A small-town feel in a centrally located neighborhood.

THE LIFESTYLE

Low-key days spent outdoors, great cuisine, and a manageable bar scene.

WHAT NOT TO EXPECT

Big-name attractions or non-stop activity.

THE MARKET

Walk-ups and doorman buildings galore, and more affordable options out in Stuy Town.

YOU’LL FALL IN LOVE WITH

Lush greenery on almost every block.

Recommend Useful Tips and Locations

Laundry facility free pickup and delivery “Best Touch" 212-685-6829

Food shopping – Morton Williams Supermarkets, 2nd Avenue, 313 E 23rd St

Fairway Market Kips Bay
550 2nd Ave

Whole Foods Market, 4 Union Square E S

Trader’s Joe, 675 6th Ave, New York, NY 10010

Parking Garage – Icon Parking: 301 E 22nd St

Parking 215 East 24th Garage Corp: 225 E 24th St (212) 696-4603

Starbucks, 296-300 3rd Ave

Think Coffee., 280 3rd Ave

Restaurants in town to suit all tastes

Is there anything that you would like to see while in town, I would be happy to point you in the right direction!

Notables

Recently restored while the neighborhood around it underwent gentrification, once was the core of the city’s most glamorous neighborhood, and Madison Square Park a pleasure paradise for the socially elite. After the Civil War, the square became a popular entertainment center, with expensive hotels on its west side including the white marble Fifth Avenue Hotel between 23rd and 24th Streets, opened in 1859. Delmonico’s Restaurant provided a place for the cream of society to dine and dance on the south side of 26th Street, and at the north- east corner of the square was architect Stanford White’s Madison Square Garden. Today these old buildings are gone, but their replacements are for the most part graciously scaled and dignified.

Dealers in insurance, giftwares and toys have replaced the social aristocracy, but the Madison Square district, surrounded by 23rd Street, 26th Street, Madison and Fifth Avenues, still retains an aura of its pleasant past. Today the square sits among offices, traffic and shops, as well as a barrage of condominiums erected nearby.

Going east on 17th past 2nd Avenue leads to Stuyvesant Square, once part of Peter Stuyvesant’s farm. Later a family gift, the 4-acre park was sold to the city for $5. The park, always bisected by Second Avenue, was landscaped in 1936 with shade trees and small pools. Today, the bronze statue of Peter Stuyvesant, installed in 1941 by Whitney Museum founder Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, still stands.

Built in 1879, is said to be the oldest surviving apartment house in the city.

East, the Queen Anne-style residence designed by George da Cunha in 1883, is one of the earliest cooperative apartments in the city.

15 Gramercy Park South. One of the architectural jewels of New York City, this landmarked Victorian Mansion is home to and is the epitome of an elegant city club of the kind that is normally available at great expense and by invitation only. Formerly the home of Samuel Tilden, Governor of New York.

16 Gramercy Park South, was the home of Edwardian actor Edwin Booth, brother of Abraham Lincoln’s assassin John Wilkes Booth. The club has a portrait of Edwin Booth by Sergeant hanging over the main fireplace. There is also a bronze statue of Edwin Booth, our greatest 19th century Shakespearian actor, in his role as Hamlet inside the park.

was the Hamilton Fish house in the 1890s, later occupied by publicist Ben Sonnenberg and actor John Barrymore. It has recently undergone renovation.

the home of James Harper, founder of Harper Brothers publishers, later Harper & Row.

Between Irving Place & Third Avenue. Known as “The Block Beautiful,” this is a row of mainly stuccoes buildings that were remodeled in the early 20th century by Frederick J. Sterner. The block was an informal colony for artists and writers in the 1920s and 30s. Music critic and novelist Carl Van Vechten lived at 151 East 19th Street and threw wild parties with his neighbors, painters Ethyl Barrymore and Robert Chanler.

Gramercy Park, between 20th & 21st Streets and Park & Third Avenues. The only private, keyed park in the entire city, this beautifully manicured oasis is only open to residents who live in buildings that directly surround the park.

Between 23rd & 26th Streets and 5th & Madison Avenues. After a $12 million dollar renovation in 2001, this park, located directly across from the Flatiron Building, was returned to the glory that it once had. With a reflecting pool, rubber-padded children’s

playground, dog run, countless planted flowers, and regular art installations, it is no wonder the park is a favorite destination for many New Yorkers and tourists.

Between 15th & 17th Streets and Rutherford & Nathan D. Perlman Place, is also a historic district very similar to Gramercy Park, except it is open to the public and divided by Second Avenue.

Between 14th & 17th Street and Broadway & Park Avenue South, is by far one of the busiest and most vibrant parks in all of Manhattan. Surrounded by fashionable eateries and shopping destinations, the park also plays host to a year-round farmers market, holiday craft village, and is a popular site for rallies and demonstrations.

Company on Madison Avenue between 26th & 27th Streets, is a neo-gothic masterpiece designed by Cass Gilbert, architect of the Woolworth Building, in 1928.

At Madison Avenue between 23rd & 24th Streets, was built in 1893 and was added onto in 1909 by the architectural firm Napoleon Le Brun & Sons.

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At 25th Street and Madison Avenue, a neo-classical building from the 19th century that houses the Appeal Court for New York.

On 23rd Street between Fifth & Broadway. At the time it was built, the Flatiron building was New York City’s first skyscraper, and thought to be not only the tallest building in the world, but the first skyscraper ever created. Designed by architect Daniel Burnham, it was nicknamed by New Yorkers for its skinny, triangular, iron-like shape, hence The Flatiron Building vs. its original name, The Fuller Building. Whatever its name, it is undoubtedly one of New York’s most photographed buildings. It is also the centerpiece of what has become a boom- ing, vibrant neighborhood.

186 Fifth Avenue. Small in scale, this red brick building with limestone trim, gabled roof, dormers and octagonal chimney tower is an early work by the architect of the Dakota Apartments and Plaza Hotel, Henry Hardenbergh.

23 Gramercy Park South, was formerly the Friends Meeting House for Quakers built in 1859 and set in a patio-type yard.

Fifth Avenue at 29th Street, built in 1854 for the Reformed Protestant Dutch Congregation first organized in 1628 by Peter Minuit, the canny Dutchman who bought Manhattan from the Native Americans for the equivalent of $24. This Romanesque Revival church takes its name from the Tuckahoe marble that covers it.

1 East 29th Street, referred to as the Little Church Around the Corner because in 1870 when other area churches refused to bury actor George Holland, his colleague, renowned thespian Joseph Jefferson, was told to go to the “little church around the corner.” This Gothic Revival church complex, 1849-1861, is set back in a shrub-filled New York version of an old Eng- lish churchyard.

at Broadway & 14th Street. This is one of the larg- est farmer’s markets in the city, held throughout the warmer months of the year on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Packed on the weekends and more mellow during weekdays, it is the best place to pick up organically grown veggies, fruits, flowers, herbs, and baked goods. The fresh cheeses from Amish farms and other farm fresh goodies from upstate New York will make any cook sing.

on Madison Avenue between 26th & 27th Streets, is a neo-gothic masterpiece designed by Cass Gilbert, architect of the Woolworth Building, in 1928.

At Madison Avenue between 23rd & 24th Streets, was built in 1893 and was added onto in 1909 by the architectural firm Napoleon Le Brun & Sons.

at 25th Street and Madison Avenue, a neo-clas- sical building from the 19th century that houses the Appeal Court for New York.

on 23rd Street between Fifth & Broadway. At the time it was built, the Flatiron building was New York City’s first skyscraper, and thought to be not only the tallest building in the world, but the first skyscraper ever created. Designed by architect Daniel Burnham, it was nicknamed by New Yorkers for its skinny, triangular, iron-like shape, hence The Flatiron Building vs. its original name, The Fuller Building. Whatever its name, it is undoubtedly one of New York’s most photographed buildings. It is also the centerpiece of what has become a boom- ing, vibrant neighborhood.

186 Fifth Avenue. Small in scale, this red brick building with limestone trim, gabled roof, dormers and octagonal chimney tower is an early work by the architect of the Dakota Apartments and Plaza Hotel, Henry Hardenbergh.

23 Gramercy Park South, was formerly the Friends Meeting House for Quakers built in 1859 and set in a patio-type yard.

Fifth Avenue at 29th Street, built in 1854 for the Reformed Protestant Dutch Congregation first organized in 1628 by Peter Minuit, the canny Dutchman who bought Manhattan from the Native Americans for the equivalent of $24. This Romanesque Revival church takes its name from the Tuckahoe marble that covers it.

1 East 29th Street, referred to as the Little Church Around the Corner because in 1870 when other area churches refused to bury actor George Holland, his colleague, renowned thespian Joseph Jefferson, was told to go to the “little church around the corner.” This Gothic Revival church complex, 1849-1861, is set back in a shrub-filled New York version of an old Eng- lish churchyard.

at Broadway & 14th Street. This is one of the larg- est farmer’s markets in the city, held throughout the warmer months of the year on Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Packed on the weekends and more mellow during weekdays, it is the best place to pick up organically grown veggies, fruits, flowers, herbs, and baked goods. The fresh cheeses from Amish farms and other farm fresh goodies from upstate New York will make any cook sing.

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